Las Vegas glam, dollars and celebs

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

Me and the TC are in Sin City, otherwise known as Las Vegas. It’s a place of parties, winners, and losers, all a-glimmer and a-shimmer under the desert sun of Nevada, USA. The TC tried her hand in Caesar’s Palace Casino and made the grand winning of $93.40. She declared herself well satisfied and left it at that.

My impressions? In the desert did we a pleasure strip decree.

The book I’m in

Rules of Vengeance, by Christopher Reich. Yes, still the same book. Travelling is a time-consuming occupation.

Recommended restaurant

La Salsa Cantina, in the Forum Shops mall on the Las Vegas Strip. Good, simple food served with experience and a smile.

Travel tip

Las Vegas is hot during the day, even in spring time.

The photos

Me on the Las Vegas Strip:

Winning in Las Vegas

“Caverns measureless to man” inside the Forum Shops mall:

Winning in Las Vegas

The grand edifice of Caesar’s Palace, just one of many casinos on the Strip:

Winning in Las Vegas

Inside, pleasure domes…

Winning in Las Vegas

… and miracles of rare device:

Winning in Las Vegas

The gambling halls, where serious money changes hands:

Winning in Las Vegas

Back outside, we encountered stretch limos, palm trees and high fashion:

Winning in Las Vegas

Where else in the world will you find Venice and ancient Rome on the same street?

Winning in Las Vegas

Not everything glitters and gleams in Las Vegas. The view from our hotel window was a bit dreary by day:

Winning in Las Vegas

Add a touch of shadow and some razzle dazzle and it’s pretty by night:

Winning in Las Vegas

Drop in on the Eiffel Tower amidst the palm trees:

Winning in Las Vegas

With a bow to Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and courtesy of the Bellagio Hotel:

And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething,
As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing,
A mighty fountain momently was forced

A few people heard that yours truly (Mark Wordsworm, Travelling Worm) was in town, and so I was in high demand for photo ops. Johnny was slightly nervous but delighted when I found the time for this shot:

Winning in Las Vegas

That’s all for today, dudes.

Published in: on 26 May 2014 at 10:29 am  Leave a Comment  
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Route 66, Arizona, USA

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

Yesterday me and the TC rode part of the historic Route 66 in Arizona, USA. En route from Flagstaff to Las Vegas, we took exit 121 from Interstate 40 and followed Route 66 all the way to Kingman.

My impressions? Tumble weed, tricycles, wide open skies.

The book I’m in

Rules of Vengeance, by Christopher Reich. I haven’t moved much (in the book, that is) since yesterday. Too busy keeping the TC company on her travels.

Travel tip

Take the time to visit the bits of nostalgia positioned along the road for your enjoyment.

The photos

Me on Route 66:

Route 66, Arizona, USA

Our vehicle of choice is a Mustang convertible. A fitting ride for this route. Here it is, with a train passing behind:

Route 66, Arizona, USA

“Kickin it on 66 at Mikes outpost saloon”:

Route 66, Arizona, USA

Sharing the road with tricycles:

Route 66, Arizona, USA

A back yard with a view:

Route 66, Arizona, USA

Me enjoying the ride:

Route 66, Arizona, USA

See y’all later!

Route 66, Arizona, USA

That’s all for today, dudes.

Published in: on 26 May 2014 at 12:05 am  Leave a Comment  
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Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

Me and the TC are spending a few days in Arizona, USA. We started in the capital, Phoenix, then drove to the Grand Canyon via Sedona and Flagstaff. The roads are good, the views are grand. Names like “Dead Horse Ranch Road” and “Bloody Basin Road” reminded us that travel wasn’t always as easy as it is now.

My impressions? Open skies, friendly people.

The book I’m in

Rules of Vengeance, by Christopher Reich. Fast action, intrigue, suspense.

Recommended accommodation

Little America Hotel, Flagstaff. Space and comfort.

Recommended restaurant

Diablo Burger in Flagstaff. Good food, friendly service, and a relaxed atmosphere.

Travel tip

Pack layers of clothing for travel in Arizona. The temperature in Phoenix was 40° Centrigrade (over 100° F). In Flagstaff, just two hours’ drive away, it was 18° C (64° F) and dropped to 9° C (48° F) at night.

The photos

Me at the Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

This worm does confess to a bit of nervousness when my Travelling Companion, the redoubtable TC, propped me in position for the above shot. There was a bit of a drop behind me. The wind was a trifle gusty, and I not so gutsy.

This storm cloud moved in a few minutes later:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

Two more intrepid souls:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

Is it possible that this streamlet dug the mighty canyon?

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

This little lady was squirreling around the edges of the canyon, storing food for the babes in her tum:

Arizona skies:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

Drifting rain:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

Delicate cactus hues:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

All shapes and sizes:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

A tiny ground squirrel living under a cactus:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

When positioning me in this pose, the TC discovered that prickly pears are aptly named:

Grand Canyon, cactus, and Arizona skies

That’s all for today, dudes.

Published in: on 25 May 2014 at 12:46 am  Leave a Comment  
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Bay Bridge in the wet

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

The TC, bless her cotton socks, paid a flying visit to San Francisco yesterday. It was a trifle wet. The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge faded poetically into the drizzle.

Jonathan was there too, of course. Here he is, coming in to land with his usual flair:

Seagull coming in to land, with Bay Bridge in the background

Even a seagull looks bedraggled in the wet:

Bay Bridge in the wet

Google in Mountain View, CA

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

Me and the TC are in Mountain View, visiting the main Google campus (often called the Googleplex) and Silicon Valley.

My impressions? Shiny happy people having fun, and working hard.

The book I’m in

Outer Bounds: Fortune’s Rising, by Sara King. This is an excellent book, with varied characters and an intriguing fantasy world. Take it with you on your travels and read it when you want a comfort zone to snuggle into. It’s full of action, goodies, and baddies.

(To be precise, I’m not exactly in this book, because the TC has decided to read it on her Kindle. I’m a real-life, three-dimensional creature, so I don’t fit into an ebook. Nevertheless, occupying a unique place in the TC’s consciousness as I do, I can inform you reliably that this is a book not to be missed.)

Recommended food store

Ava’s Downtown Market & Deli, 340 Castro Street, Mountain View, California.

Recommended chocolate tasting

The Chocolate Garage, 654 Gilman St. Suite G(arage), Palo Alto, California.

Travel tip

It’s useful to have a car when visiting Silicon Valley. The towns are wide spread, and there’s plenty to see.

The photos

Me on a Google bike, on site at Google, Mountain View:

Me on a Google bike

The bikes are dotted around the Google campus. You can tell them by their colours. Googlers pick them up and drop them off on their way from office to office. It takes half an hour to walk from one end of the campus to the other, so the bikes offer an efficient and healthy alternative.

The Google Android building:

Google Android building

You’ll find an appetising array of cupcakes and cookies next to the Android statues:

Google cupcakes

The TC spends much of her time in the training building, which lies behind this restful pond. Note the blue hammocks under the white umbrella, awaiting weary Nooglers as they emerge from the orientation classes:

Pond near training building

Stan the dinosaur, a T-rex that inhabits the Google grounds:

Stan, the Google dinosaur

Downtown Mountain View is pretty, well kept, and well supplied with restaurants:

Castro Street, Mountain View

Another shot of Castro Street, Mountain View:

Castro Street, Mountain View

The Mountain View City Hall is rather magnificent:

City Hall in Mountain View

If you’d like the TC’s perspective on the life and chocolate at Google, try her post: Report from a new Google technical writer.

That’s all for today, dudes.

University of Queensland in Brisbane

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

Me and the TC popped over to Brisbane last week, to check out the two main campuses of the University of Queensland (UQ). My previous post includes moody shots of Ipswich and some fish in a library. Now for the lowdown on the big smoke itself.

My impressions? A university with character, in a city of character, owned by a river full of attitude.

The book I’m in

The Intercept, by Dick Wolf. Fast, believable action.

Recommended accommodation

Manor Apartment Hotel, 289 Queen Street, Brisbane. It’s in the centre of the city. The service is friendly, the rooms are roomy, and the breakfast is excellent.

Travel tip

Take a ferry trip down the river. It’s not always the fastest way of getting from A to B, but it’s a great way of seeing the city and relaxing at the same time. The ferry ride from the Eagle Street Pier to the UQ campus (St Lucia) takes about half an hour.

The photos

Me on a map of Brisbane, on a podium, on the top of Mount Coot-Tha:

Me and a map of Brisbane

The dark squiggly line running across the map is the river.

A view of the city of Brisbane, from the viewing site on Mount Coot-Tha:

Brisbane seen from Mount Coot-Tha

The St Lucia campus is further inland by a couple of bends of the river. In this picture, you can see the wall of the great court that lies in the centre of the UQ’s St Lucia campus. It’s to the right of the patch of river, in front of the four poles rising up from the bridge:

Another view from Mt Coot-Tha

St Stephen’s cathedral, Brissie:

Cathedral of St Stephen in Brisbane

“Brissie”, pronounced “Brizzy”, is the locals’ rather irreverent name for their city.

We took the ferry from the CBD to the university’s St Lucia campus. Here’s the striking Kurilpa Bridge, seen from the ferry:

Kurilpa Bridge

Before depositing you on shores academical, this worm would like to take you on a diversion semiotical. Take a look at the sign below, which this worm spotted on a lavatory door at the end of a queue of women:

Lavatory sign

The women in the queue ignored this door. Instead, with great patience and forbearance, they were waiting in line for a single toilet, which had a sign containing just three pictures: the figure of a woman, a wheelchair, and a baby-changing platform. The patient queue assumed the first toilet (shown above) was for disabled people only, and the second was for everyone. The TC, bless her cotton socks, piped up that she was sure it was OK to use the disabled toilet. Imagine her delighted surprise, and that of everyone else in the queue, to discover six vacant toilets behind the above door, all ready and waiting for “ambulant” people’s use.

So, this worm muses, past experience has conditioned us to expect a special toilet for disabled people and to assume the difficult word “ambulant” is yet another term for “disabled”. And we don’t read.

Here’s another diversion. This worm as vastly amused to see the following sign in the hotel lobby. Shades of Sweeney Todd?

Doors at the end of the hotel lobby

A closer look:

The words on the sign

Moving on from dark humour to the light of academia, this is the outside wall of the magnificent great court at UQ’s St Lucia campus:

Outside the great court

Inside is spacious and restful:

Inside the great court

The detail on the walls:

The inside walls of the great court

One of the grotesques, rather gentler than many of that ilk:

A close view of one of the heads on the wall

That’s all for today, dudes.

University of Queensland in Ipswich

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

Me and the TC hopped up to Brisbane and Ipswich last week, to visit the two main campuses of the University of Queensland (UQ). Our first stop was Ipswich, about 40 kilometres to the west of Brisbane. The UQ Ipswich campus caters for students in the medical and health sciences, as well as arts and education.

My impressions? There’s more to Ipswich than you might think.

The book I’m in

A Nameless Witch, by A. Lee Martinez. This is a truly delightful book, especially for those of us who like a good dose of fun with our fantasy. The hapless hero of the book, a witch without name, suffers temptations both carnal and carnivorous, and manages to conquer an evil sorcerer to boot.

Recommended restaurants

Urban Pantry, 181 Brisbane Street, Ipswich. A great place for coffee, cakes, pastries, and lunch. The welcome is friendly, the food good. Photo below.

Travel tip

Look out for cane toads. Disappointingly, this worm spotted nary a one, but I’m reliably informed the city of Ipswich is hopping with them.

The photos

There’s no photograph of me, your intrepid Travelling Worm, in this post! I do assure you I was there, but I managed to dodge the TC’s camera for a few hours. Rest assured, there’s the obligatory homage to me in my next post, snapped when we were making our way to Brisbane. For now, please enjoy these images of Ipswich.

We climbed to the top of the water tower on Denmark Hill, to get a view of the city of Ipswich. This is the tower, with the staircase leading up to the top:

Water tower on Denmark Hill

A view of sky and layered hills, from the top of the tower:

A view from the top of the water tower

The Old Flour Mill in Ipswich is currently undergoing renovation. A few shops and restaurants have already opened their doors inside this attractive building:

The Old Flour Mill

Another interesting edifice on Brisbane Street, Ipswich:

A building in Brisbane Street

Goleby’s building in Brisbane Street:

Goleby's building in Brisbane Street, Ipswich

Another aspect of the same building:

Another aspect of Goleby's building

More of Brisbane Street, including the Urban Pantry – an excellent lunch venue. It’s to the left of the middle of the photo, on the ground floor, with a light brown facade:

Urban Pantry on Brisbane Street

We strolled around the Ipswich campus of the University of Queensland. It’s nicely laid out, with plenty of space and pleasing spaces. This is a view of a main thoroughfare, taken from inside the medical school:

On the UQ Ipswich campus

The library is gorgeous. This bookworm was sorely tempted to take up permanent residence:

The library

A river runs through it. Yes, through the library. With fish:

Fish in the library

Join me in my next post for a look at the big smoke, Brisbane, and the UQ campus there.

That’s all for today, dudes.

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

Me and the TC spent a couple of days in New Orleans this week. One morning we braved the thunder storms and the warnings of flash flooding, to go on the Honey Island Swamp Tour with Cajun Encounters.

My impressions? Trees, trees’ knees, reflections of trees, and hidden danger.

The book I’m in

Wool, by Hugh Howey.

Travel tip

In my last post, I recommended that you watch out for people who don’t blink, as they may not be what they seem. Now this worm can inform you that alligators do blink, so you can trust that they are what they seem.

The photos

Me, your intrepid travelling worm, about to set out on the swamp tour:

01-IMG_4772

At the start of the tour we were on a wide river with swampy banks on each side:

02-IMG_4777

This vertical-lift bridge is in working order. The entire bridge, including the house in the middle, rises up the towers to let higher craft pass underneath. Our boat captain said you need to call about four hours beforehand if you want the bridge to lift:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Water lilies on the river bank:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Witch’s hair lichen drapes the trees:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Are those all lily pads amongst the trees? The powerful zoom on the TC’s camera reveals a usurper:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

A snake coils comfortably on a tree trunk. I’m not sure what type of snake it is. Maybe a Copperhead:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Reflections of trees wobble in the boat’s wake:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Another quiet scene of lilly pads, trees and reflections. The TC is fond of such scenes:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

All is quiet, nothing stirs:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Yet danger lurks ever close by. Here, in the bank next to the boat, a Cottonmouth rests:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Locals build their houses safely above flood level:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Right next door, someone thinks the safe level is even higher. A reaction to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, our guide informs us:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Alligators smile on a log:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Inexorable beauty:

Honey Island swamp tour in New Orleans

Do alligators like marshmallows? Watch this video to find out:

That’s all for today, dudes.

New Orleans views and vampires

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

Me and the TC are in New Orleans for just two days. This city is gorgeous. Colour and light, in the buildings and the people. Tourists at play. Locals working hard for a living.

My impressions? An abundance of stories.

And the vampires? Join me in a journey from light to dark, if you dare.

The book I’m in

Wool, by Hugh Howey. The TC is about half way through the book. It looks like the IT crowd are the baddies. This worm whole-heartedly approves of this choice of reading matter.

Travel tip

Drop in on Bourbon Street at dusk. It rocks. Literally.

And watch out for people who don’t blink. They may not be what they seem.

Pronunciation tip

To say “New Orleans” like a local, pronounce it as “Norlns”. And go heavy on the “or” part.

Recommended accommodation

Hotel Mazarin, 730 Bienville Street, New Orleans. Clean, comfortable, and conveniently located in the French Quarter. Just a single complaint from the TC: Our room was near a generator, which emitted a constant uncomfortable hum and high-pitched squeal.

Recommended restaurant

Olivier’s, 204 Decatur Street, New Orleans. Tasty Creole food, excellent and caring service.

The photos

Me on the streests of New Orleans, with the city seal:

New Orleans and vampires

A view from the aeroplane on our way in, showing the city centre on the bend of the Mississipi river The bridge is actually two bridges, forming the Crescent City Connection:

New Orleans and vampires

The beautiful, wide Canal Street, which runs along the edge of the French Quarter and leads down to the Mississipi River:

New Orleans and vampires

Jazz Gumbo in Canal Street:

New Orleans and vampires

The Mississippi River:

New Orleans and vampires

A tasty and colourful dish of Creole food from Olivier’s in Decatur Street:

New Orleans and vampires

A colourful row of houses in the French Quarter of New Orleans:

New Orleans and vampires

A mule wending its way through the French Quarter. The TC was taking a photograph of the gallery above, and the interesting door at bottom right, when the mule wandered into the shot:

New Orleans and vampires

Many of the buildings are decorated with ornate ironwork, which the TC calls “broekie lace”. This ornate gallery sports a drape showing the New Orleans fleur-de-lis, used all over the city to symbolise its recovery since Hurricane Katrina:

New Orleans and vampires

Renovating a lovely house:

New Orleans and vampires

Are you ready to share a slide down the slippery slope into another world? It begins here:

New Orleans views and vampires

Marie Laveau’s House of Voodoo:

New Orleans views and vampires

This worm, hob-nobbing with the zombies and voodoo dolls:

New Orleans views and vampires

A palm reader in Bourbon Street:

New Orleans views and vampires

As dusk draws in, Bourbon Street hots up:

New Orleans views and vampires

And the serious dudes move in. The TC and I dared to do a ghost and vampire tour with Lord Chaz:

New Orleans views and vampires

How does a vampire use a mobile phone? With a pen, of course:

New Orleans views and vampires

One of the eeriest spots on the tour was the nunnery next to St Mary’s Catholic Church. The attic windows are permanently closed, with dormers that are nailed shut. As our tour guide pointed out, this is most unusual in New Orleans, especially in edifices from the days before air conditioning. The attic windows form an essential cooling function. This sealed attic is the source of the belief that New Orleans has vampire inhabitants, and has had them for generations. We also heard perplexing and inexplicable stories of women shipped to New Orleans with arrays of 5-sided coffins, all to disappear into the nunnery. And hundreds of dead babies under the wall. This has to be the spookiest place to be, especially when you’re there with a being who doesn’t blink. As we were:

New Orleands views and vampires

This woman, all unknowing, is leaning against a lamp post on the most dangerous corner of  New Orleans. In the house above her, the Carter brothers murdered 18 people by drinking their blood through their wrists. A little girl escaped one night, after suffering through five nights of feasting, and the Carter brothers were at last brought to justice. But later when the city opened the Carter brothers’ graves, they found nothing. The brothers had vanished. And since then, so the stories go, New Orleans has suffered from numerous serial killers, some apprehended, some not. There’s one active right now ….

New Orleans views and vampires

That’s all for today, dudes.

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

This is the blog of Mark Wordsworm, the travelling worm. I’m a 25-year-old bookmark and can proudly boast my own Hallmark serial number, 95 HBM 80-1. You’ll probably want to read all about me and my Travelling Companion (the TC).

Today’s travel notes

This week me and the TC spent four days in Atlanta, Georgia. That’s in the deep south of the United States, where people speak with a delightful slow drawl and are very, very polite. They also say “y’all” to get around the lamentable lack of a second-person plural in the English language. The deep south is also the home of deep-fried everything. A picture in the post proves it.

The TC spent most of her time working hard at a conference. This worm spent most of my time on the same page of the book I’m currently in, because the TC didn’t have much time to read.

We did get out one evening, to do the famous Atlanta Ghost Tour.

My impressions? Wide quiet streets, imposing churches, boarded-up buildings, and shiny office blocks. Not many ghosts materialised. To be exact, not a one. But the tour was fun anyway. A good way to see the night-time streets of Atlanta.

The book I’m in

Wool, by Hugh Howey. The TC has only just started this science fiction novel. This worm is enthralled by the characters and their situation, and keen to know more. I’ll have to prod the TC to get a move on.

Travel tip

If your bag keeps falling off your shoulder, or you feel a tap on your arm, or your hat lifts off your head, there’s a ghost in the ‘hood.

Recommended accommodation

Hyatt Regency Atlanta, at 265 Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta. The TC is attending a conference, so we’re residing in the conference hotel. It’s a large, well-organised and very pleasant place to stay. Highly recommended for location, service and comfort.

Recommended restaurant

Ted’s Montana Grill, 133 Luckie Street, Atlanta. Excellent service, a friendly ambience, and plenty of character. The food is tasty too.

The photos

Me cowering in a park opposite the eerily-named and ghost-ridden Medical Arts building in Atlanta:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

Our tech-savvy band of ghost-busters brandished various electronic gadgets to aid in the search. Below is the Ghost Radar app on my iPhone. This screenshot shows the Ghost Radar has picked up two presences. The red blip is emitting the strongest phantom vibes ,the yellow has medium strengths:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

The leader of the ghost tour brought along a couple of K2 ghost meters, powerful detectors of spirit presence:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

What struck me is the way the churches muddle in with the city’s glossy sky scrapers:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

Outside the Medical Arts building, the K2 devices picked up a ghost. She’s well known. Her name is Sally, and she reputedly can tell creepy stories of the medical experiments carried out on hapless patients in the Medical Arts building of old.

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

We took a closer look at the Medical Arts building, later the same evening. Yes, we looped back for more chills:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

This is the door. Knock if you dare:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

The leader of our ghost tour told us the sad story of the Ellis Hotel in Peachtree Street, Atlanta. This building, then called the Winecoff Hotel, was the location of America’s most deadly hotel fire. Candy Kid, a well-known local thief, set the fire on purpose, because he wanted to kill a particular man.  The intended victim escaped, and 119 died in his stead. Unsurprisingly, there are reports of many hauntings in and around the Ellis Hotel:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

Many people take photos of this church, only to find a ghost or two in the shot. Do you see any?

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

As the night grows darker, the display in an army surplus store is evocative of other worlds:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

A gas mask in the next window sends a shudder up this worm’s spine. (And my spine is not stiff, even at the best of times.)

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

The TC snapped this picture of the Atlanta city seal at the base of a lamp post. The bird is a phoenix rising from its ashes. The motto is “resurgens”, Latin for “rising again”. These symbolise the rebuilding of the city after it was destroyed in the American Civil War.

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

To finish off with, I’d like to lighten the tone. Looking for proof that they fry everything in the deep south? Look no further:

Ghosts in Atlanta GA

That’s all for today, dudes.

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